Electric airplanes may be our last hope for boosting air travel

Electric airplanes may be our last hope for boosting air travel

Electric airplanes may be our last hope for boosting air travel

It is speculated that the introduction of electric airplanes may take a few more decades; however, they are eagerly awaited. Magnix, a company that hails from Seattle, is taking it slow and wants to invest its time in developing its electric aircraft. These aircraft are now being tested by the company, a producer of electric motors, and the best part is that these air vehicles are zero-emission. The company wants to build a strong base and simultaneously push the growth of air-travel after the pandemic plunge witnessed by the industry. Magnix is currently focussing on modifying and retrofitting already manufactured and small planes in use. For example, the Cessna Caravan 208, which has been in use since 1982, is the first non-experimental airplane that has been modified by the company and will fly across the Moses Lake, Washington.

The company wants to depict that commercial compact (9-seater) electric airplanes could be a viable option in the coming years. However, the introduction of larger (100-seater) airplanes that run on electricity and adhere to zero-emission norms are a thing of the future. Roei Ganzarski, CEO of Magnix, stated, ‘It’s a niche market, but we can start now, get working on it and push the envelope to progress the entire industry, let’s get to market quickly for the main purpose of being able to start this revolution.’ Magni500 is a motor that is claimed to have the capacity to fuel the single propeller Ecaravan and can accommodate five to nineteen passengers. The Caravan airplane is thirty-seven-foot-long and is the largest electric airplane to take flight yet.

Magnix’s main goal is to prove that consumers can opt for this new means of transport, which is safe, efficient in terms of both cost and convenience, and greener. It could, therefore, contribute massively to the reignition of the air industry.